Old Cotton Wagon

This old wagon and bale of cotton is displayed just inside of the historic Cotton Exchange, an eclectic collection of shops and eateries that are located in several building that were the original cotton warehouses.
An interesting excerpt from Ideal Living which has a wealth of good information about living in Wilmington:
Incorporated in 1739, Wilmington’s location on the Cape Fear River quickly enabled it to bloom into a thriving commercial center with an active port. In fact, during the 18th and 19th centuries, Wilmington was one of the biggest centers in the world for exporting cotton and naval stores, and the port is still active today. “A lot of the stones used in downtown Wilmington are ballast stones. People came up with empty ships to pick up cotton, and used the stones for weight,” says Gareth Evans, Associate Director of the Historic Wilmington Foundation. “Then they offloaded the stones…they either wound up at the bottom of the river or incorporated into the architecture.”

This photo was chosen for the Monochrome Weekly.

To see more daily photos of other cities around the world, visit City Daily Photo.

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5 comments on “Old Cotton Wagon”

  1. A good mono and an interesting post.

  2. Great subject for black and white and interesting info.

  3. I like your picture very much. Suitable in black and white.

  4. Awesome picture! Ilove this kind of shot, it looks perfect in black and white.
    I’m not too far from Wilmington one of these days I wan’t to explore and take some pictures.

  5. A great photo….and I am always interested in cotton/plants/anything.


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